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Georg Friedrich Haas in America

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 05 July 2013

Haas (c) Lucerne Festival, Priska Ketterer.jpgVivien Schweitzer of the New York Times has reviewed the Austrian Cultural Forum’s welcome concert for Georg Friedrich Haas, whose tenure as a professor at Columbia University starts in September.

Read the full article on the New York Times.

Find out more about Atthis and listen to an excerpt.

Georg Friedrich Haas at Columbia University

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 01 July 2013

Georg Friedrich Haas (c) Universal Edition, Eric Marinitsch

“July 1, 2013 marks Georg Friedrich Haas’s first day as a resident of the United States, where he will join the composition faculty at Columbia University. This move puts him squarely in the historical tradition of European composers such as Gustav Mahler, Arnold Schoenberg, and Igor Stravinsky, all of whom moved to the United States and became part of the musical life of America.”

The austrian cultural forum new york celebrates this with a concert dedicated to Haas on 2 July. On the programme: Georg Friedrich Haas’s Atthis, Berg, Webern, and Schönberg.

Find out more about Atthis and listen to an excerpt.

Georg Friedrich Haas: Atthis
for soprano and 8 instruments | 40’
Sharon Harms, s; Argento Chamber Ensemble, cond. Michel Galante

Composer portrait: Georg Friedrich Haas on SR2 KulturRadio

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 25 June 2013

SR2 KulturradioIn this week’s episode of Movement, titled “Begrenzte Annäherung” – “Vergeblich”? [limited approximation – in vain?], Wolfgang Korb talks with Georg Friedrich Haas about the composer’s music.

The programme starts on 27 June at 20:04 (CET/CEST), SR2 offers a live stream. Recordings and excerpts of the following pieces will be played:

limited approximations
Pi-hsien Chen, Christoph Grund, Florian Hoelscher, Akiko Okabe, Sven Thomas kiebler, Julia Vogelsänger, pno; SWR-Sinfonieorchester Baden-Baden und Freiburg, cond. Silvain Cambreling

Georg Friedrich Haas (c) Lucerne Festival, Priska Ketterer3 Hommages: “Hommage à Ligeti”
Marino Formenti, pno

… wie stille brannte das Licht
Sarah Wegener, s; Cornelis Witthoefft, pno

… wie stille brannte das Licht
Sarah Wegener, ms; Musikfabrik, cond. Roland Kluttig

String Quartet No. 2
Kairos Quartett

Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich
Lukas Schiske, perc; Klangforum Wien, cond. Silvain Cambreling

Hertervig-Studien
Schola Heidelberg, cond. Walter Nußbaum

Concerto for baritone saxophone and orchestra
Marcus Weiss, sax; WDR-Sinfonieorchester Köln, cond. Emilio Pomárico

in vain
Klangforum Wien, cond. Silvain Cambreling

Georg Friedrich Haas: in vain

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 23 May 2013

Tonight Georg Friedrich Haas’ in vain will be performed as a part of a composer’s portrait dedicated to Haas at the Schwetzinger SWR Festspiele. Jonathan Stockhammer conducts the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart.

You can watch an interview with Sir Simon Rattle, in which the conductor identifies in vain as “one of the only already acknowledged masterpieces of the 21st century”, here:

The concert will be broadcast by SWR 2 on 16 June 2013, listen live.

Georg Friedrich Haas: in vain
for 24 instruments | 70’
2 1 2 1 - 2 0 2 0 - perc(2), hp, acc, pno, sax, vln(3), vla(2), vc(2), cb
23/5/2013, Schwetzingen; Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart, cond. Jonathan Stockhammer

Composer portrait: Georg Friedrich Haas in Schwetzingen

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 08 May 2013

Georg Friedrich Haas (c) Eric Marinitsch, Universal Edition

The Schola Heidelberg and Walter Nußbaum present a composer portrait of Georg Friedrich Haas at the Schwetzinger SWR Festspiele on 9 May 2013. Among the pieces played will be the Hertervig-Studien and SCHWEIGEN.

Later that day, the Kairos Quartett will perform Haas’ String Quartet no.3, In iij. Noct.” in complete darkness, with the four musicians playing from memory in different parts of the room. Darkness, [...] is not present in this piece merely as an absence of light, but becomes the key theme of the work” (Georg Friedrich Haas)


SWR2 LogoFor those who cannot attend: a recording of the concert will be broadcast by SWR2 on 18 May:

Schwetzinger SWR Festspiele 2013
Recorded on 9 May 2013
ATTHIS; de terra fine; SCHWEIGEN; Hertervig-Studien
Sarah Wegener, s; Tianwa Yang, vln
Kairos Quartett; Members of the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart of the SWR; Schola Heidelberg, cond. Walter Nussbaum
SWR2 | Listen live
Saturday, 18/5/2013, 20:03

Haas, Baltakas, Sotelo, Bedford

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 11 April 2013

Live transmission of the world première of ... wie stille brannte das Licht for soprano and piano

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 27 February 2013

GEORG_FRIEDRICH_HAAS (c) Lucerne Festival_Priska_KettererTomorrow, 28 February 2013, the world première of Georg Friedrich Haas’ … wie stille brannte das Licht for soprano and piano takes place at the Philharmonie Luxembourg. The concert starts at 20:04 and you can listen to a live transmission of it here.

Sarah Wegener, whose enormous vocal range and incredible facility with precise microtonal intonation inspired Haas to write the part as if tailor-made for her, sings soprano.

Klangspuren Festival continues with Beat Furrer's Gaspra

Posted by Johannes Feigl on 24 September 2012

Beat FurrerGaspra for ensemble will be performed on 25 September by the TIMF Ensemble under Soo-Yeoul Choi at the Klangspuren Festival.

Other UE composers that are represented at the Klangspuren Festival are Wolfgang Rihm, Pierre Boulez, Georg Friedrich Haas and Johannes Maria Staud.

An Austrian evening – in two very different styles

Posted on 03 February 2012

Georg Friedrich Haas

If you are in Boston tonight, go and see Sound Icon perform Georg Friedrich Haas’ ethereal 70-minute in vain at the Institute of Contemporary Art (audio sample on this page).

Friedrich Cerha

If you are not in Boston tonight, listen live on BBC Radio 3 (7:30pm London time) to the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra performing Friedrich Cerha’s Wiener Kaleidoskop – a romp around Vienna’s musical traditions (audio sample on this page).

For those looking for something else for a Friday evening, there’s Rihm in Saarbrücken (COLL’ARCO), Weill in Graz (Threepenny Opera), Janacek in Munich (Glagolitic Mass) and Reims (Jenufa), Schreker in Cologne (Chamber Symphony), Borisova-Ollas in Gothenburg (The Kingdom of Silence), Mahler in Bangkok (Symphony No. 9), Birtwistle in London (Linoi), Zemlinsky in Valencia (Lyric Symphony), Kodály in Arnhem (Dances of Galanta), Oldfield in Neuenkirchen (Tubular Bells), Bartók in Athens (Miraculous Mandarin), Berio in Düsseldorf (Rendering)

See the full list of today’s performances here

Haas world première in Munich

Posted on 30 October 2011

Pinakothek der ModernePart two of Georg Friedrich Haas’ SCHWEIGEN – II. Lampedusa for soprano and mezzo-soprano – is given its world première this Sunday at the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich.

Soloists from the Neue Vocalsolisten perform as part of the Escalier du Chant project by the artist Olaf Nicolai.

Georg Friedrich Haas in LA

Posted on 04 October 2011

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles

The US premiere of Georg Friedrich Haas’ chants oubliés for chamber orchestra takes place tonight in Los Angeles.

Otto Tausk conducts the LA Phil New Music Group at the Walt Disney Concert Hall.

The title refers to late works by Franz Liszt (Valses oubliés, Romance oubliée) – Liszt’s technique of presenting one-part melodies in a different sound environment (often that of the piano) is applied here to the possibilities of the chamber orchestra.

Tom Service on in vain by Georg Friedrich Haas

Posted on 12 September 2011

Tom ServiceHere’s Tom Service on the recent performance of Georg Friedrich Haas’ in vain at the Lucerne Festival.

“... an hour-long ensemble work that made a shattering nocturnal impression … a monumental work”

Read the full article.

Listen to an excerpt on this page.

Haas’ in vain in Salzburg and Lucerne

Posted on 12 August 2011

Georg Friedrich HaasGeorg Friedrich Haas’ 70 minute work for 24 instruments, in vain, is one of the most celebrated works in the composer’s catalogue.

It has been a highly praised in the New York Times (Vivienne Schweitzer wrote of “waves of opulently strange, beautiful sounds”); it was the central part of an 8-hour ‘symposium’ concert by Klangforum Wien; and has already been performed 31 times since its world première in 2000.

Now, in a kind of pan-Alpine derby, the work is being performed twice in the same evening at two different major festivals (Saturday 13 Aug).

Emilio Pomàrico conducts Klangforum Wien at the Salzburg Festival, while at the Lucerne Festival Jürg Henneberger conducts Ensemble Phoenix Basel.

Listen to an excerpt of in vain on this page.

The Lucerne concert is part of a special focus on Haas this year, as part of which his opera Nacht (night is the central theme of the festival this year) can be heard (17 Sept) as well as his string quartets, including the world première of the String Quartet No 7 by the Arditti Quartet (10 Sept), and various ensemble works.

See all forthcoming performances of works by Georg Friedrich Haas in our online calendar.

A week of world premières

Posted on 03 June 2011

Georg Friedrich HaasOur week of world premières continues, following yesterday’s new work by Vykintas Baltakas.

On Saturday, Georg Friedrich Haas’ new work for chamber orchestra, chants oubliés, is part of a portrait concert given by the Munich Chamber Orchestra, which is joined by Teodoro Anzelotti and Kelvin Hawthorne.

Johannes Maria Staud’s new monodrama for narrator and ensemble, Der Riß durch den Tag, is given its world première in Dresden by Bruno Ganz and the Staatskapelle Dresden.

In other news, the Dutch Radio’s famous ZaterdagMatinee series presents the Dutch première of Wolfgang Rihm’s QUID EST DEUS? The concert is broadcast live on Dutch Radio (14:15, Sat 4 June CEST).

Haas’ 3rd String Quartet in Milan

Posted on 13 April 2011

Sentieri SelvaggiCommunication in the dark

The Ensemble Sentiere Selvaggi performs Georg Friedrich Haas’ 3rd String Quartet, In iij. Noct., tonight at the Teatro Elfo Puccini in Milan.

The work is performed in complete darkness, preferably with all doors and even the emergency lighting covered up. It is at first a very disconcerting thing, simply because we very rarely experience total darkness.

What might seem like a gimmick though has a dramatic effect on the musician’s performance – playing as they are required to do from memory and communicating purely through the music itself – as well as on our perception of the music.